Thursday, April 28, 2016

Brannon Hill condos allowed 30 days to remove trash | www.ajc.com

Brannon Hill condos allowed 30 days to remove trash | www.ajc.com: "Residents of a trash-filled and partially burned-down condo complex in DeKalb County are being given 30 days to clean up.

The Brannon Hill homeowners’ association and the county agreed in court Thursday to allow the community to remove debris, worn mattresses and tires strewn across parking lots before the government considers stepping in."


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Another crumbling condo development has become a burden on local government to the point where it may be declared a public nuisance.

2 comments:

IC_deLight said...

Local government taxed these folks while relegating them to 3rd class citizens. Let's not forget that Illinois treats condo owners as being subject to eviction. "Eviction" is applicable to renters not owners.

Local government didn't complain while it got the taxes off these folks for decades. Local government deserves every bit of the decaying infrastructure falling in on it. Maybe it should stop encouraging condominium development.

Deborah Goonan said...

If you look at the history of Brannon Hill, you realize this condo association was doomed from the start. It was unrealistic to assume an association of very low income owners could ever make this a self-sustatining housing "community."

The condo industry has been pushing this erroneous notion that condos are "affordable housing." Maybe affordable to buy in with government insured mortgages, tax credits for developers, etc. But usually not affordable to maintain beyond the first decade or even sooner when construction or renovations are particularly shoddy. And if assessments remain steady, deferred maintenance and deterioration usually follow.

It would be an intersting study to follow a sample of condo associations over 5 -10 years and take note of assessment increases, special assessments, deferred maintenance, HOA liens and foreclosures, lender foreclosures, etc. Bring in some appraisers to determine property values pre- and post-study. Compare that data to more readlily available data on small municipalities.